Hungarian-Americans

Hungarian_AmericansToday we’ve got Hungarians! Enjoy!

Link t0 Tableau: https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/HungarianAmericans

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Scottish-Americans

Scottish_AmericansToday we look at a widely dispersed segment of the American population – Scottish Americans. Scotts have a presence out west, in the New England region, and in a band along the Appalachian mountains.

Don’t have much to add – I *think* I’ve got some Scottish in my family tree — but I’m one of those mongrel Americans with so many different ancestries, calling myself American seems simplest at this point.

Link to Tableau: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/ScottishAmericans?:embed=y&:display_count=no

 

 

American Americans

American_AmericansAfter spending some time looking at ethnic heritage in America, it’s time to turn to a new demographic: Those who respond, when asked for their ethnic background by the census, as “American.”

This ethnic/ancestral type reflects, presumably, Americans who no longer know, or no longer care, about the various derivations which contribute to their family trees. They’ve become a modern, generic homogenized ethnicity – the American-American.

I suspect I’m close to joining the American-Americans. I’m a little hazy on my family tree, beyond the knowledge that I’ve got some German, some Welsh, some Scottish and English progenitors. With such vague, and diverse, roots, simply calling myself “American” makes more and more sense to me.

Link to the full map & tool: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/AmericanAmericans?:embed=y&:display_count=no

The Foreign-Born in America

Foreign_BornToday I take a brief break from ethnicity to look at the percentage of residents in American zip codes who were born outside of the United States. This isn’t the same as the percentage of non-citizens, mind you, which I looked at separately, and which I’ve turned in to the Reveille. One of the major themes of my series on ethnic/racial heritage is that the United States is an immigrant nation – the primary difference between each immigrant group is order of arrival.

The map of foreign-born residents is the simplest way to see where the newest immigrants have settled – where the newest addition to our mixing bowl can be found. Some may not be citizens, and there is no way at the moment to tell whether they’ll be able to become legal citizens of the United States. That debate is a big part of why I became interested in this data. However, legal or not, they’re here – and now we can see visually *where* they are. Originally, ancestry and ethnic mix seemed like a good, quick way to show that the United States is a hodge-podge of post-Revolution immigrants. Instead, I found the dispersal of different ancestries compelling. Many maps later, here we are.

Share with anyone you know living in the United States, but born outside her borders. They can see how many of their neighbors share their non-native born status.

A link to my Tableau visualization, which allows for more exploration of the data and the map: https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/ForeignBorn