French-Americans, and Louisiana’s heritage

french_americans

 

 

Today I turn my census-driven attention to the French – a population of particular importance in Louisiana.

Louisiana owes much of her culture, her food, and her style to the French blood which runs through the byways and bayous of the state. While it’s no secret that Louisiana has a large number of French-descended residents, seeing the distribution mapped out (and seeing it nationally) is fascinating.

I’ll continue this series, looking at more of the heritage of American immigration.

The dataset I’m working with, the 2013 census estimations, has some glaring oversights, however: It doesn’t include data on native Americans, african-Americans (except for sub-saharan Africans), or Hispanics. I’ll need to get data for those groups elsewhere, so that I can include them in the project. For whatever reason, this particular dataset seems to have a strong focus on European immigration. Still, given that many of the folks voicing strong opinions during the current immigration debate are of European descent, perhaps this oversight isn’t a lethal one. Aside from native Americans, we all came from somewhere else. These maps and this data helps to show precisely where we came from, and where we ended up.

Here’s a link to the Tableau tool so you can see things in greater detail, as well as zoom in, get county info, etc:

https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/frenchamericans

Enjoy and share! 😀

Advertisements

Technicolor Hyper-kinetic Campaign Finance Explosion!

second-sen-gif

The Louisiana Senate race draws on money from across the nation. The animation above is looking at individual donations – donations that can be tied directly to a particular human (rather than some committee) and shows how, over time, both Landrieu and Cassidy have seen their in-state share of donations shrink. Cassidy ends up with 58% of his donations coming from Louisiana, but if we look at breakdowns by quarter, we find that in the most recent quarter, Cassidy received more out-of-state dollars (as a percent of his total) than Landrieu did.

Click on any graphic to get it full-screen — they look *much* better that way.

Percent from Louisiana Line Chart

Before you become completely offended by so much outside money flowing into Louisiana, it’s important to have a benchmark. Hence, we take a look at Kentucky, where *both* Senate candidates are running at roughly 20% in-state donor levels. Let me know which design you prefer, by the way – I like the Louisiana animation better. It’s more recent, and I think I improved it with time. I’d like to know what everyone else thinks.kengif2

 

 

 

 

 

 

An overall comparison of district 6 congressional candidates — this is pure horse-race coverage stuff, trying to show lead changes in fundraising over time:

new-all-8-house-members-animated-gif

Now, let’s kick up the epilepsy-inducing intensity! Here are animations of District 6 house race candidates, and their in-state percentages of donations over time:

edwin-edwards-animated-gif-FIXED       new-animated-gif-graves

new-animated-gif-felder   new-animated-gif-trey-thomas

new animated gif claitor

new-animated-gif-mcculloch

new-animated-gif-dietzel

new-animated-gif-whitney

And, finally, we look at the same candidates, only *this* time we examine their in-district versus out-of-district fundraising. Be sure and check out Edwin Edwards and how he changes once you look at district rather than state.

district-animated-gif---charles-thomas  district-animated-gif---edwin-edwards

district-animated-gif-mccullochdistrict-animated-gif---gravesdistrict-animated-gif---claitordistrict-animated-gif---whitneydistrict-animated-gif---dietzeldistrict-animated-gif---cassie-felder