Italian-Americans

Italian-AmericansToday, we look at Italian-Americans – a demographic strongly concentrated in the New York / New Jersey area.  While that’s certainly the largest Italian enclave in the United States, the smaller New Orleans Italian community also shows up – giving insight into one of the many populations which make up Louisiana’s unique (and delicious) ancestral blend.

Tableau tool link: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/Italian-Americans?:embed=y&:display_count=no

Hungarian-Americans

Hungarian_AmericansToday we’ve got Hungarians! Enjoy!

Link t0 Tableau: https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/HungarianAmericans

Scottish-Americans

Scottish_AmericansToday we look at a widely dispersed segment of the American population – Scottish Americans. Scotts have a presence out west, in the New England region, and in a band along the Appalachian mountains.

Don’t have much to add – I *think* I’ve got some Scottish in my family tree — but I’m one of those mongrel Americans with so many different ancestries, calling myself American seems simplest at this point.

Link to Tableau: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/ScottishAmericans?:embed=y&:display_count=no

 

 

American Americans

American_AmericansAfter spending some time looking at ethnic heritage in America, it’s time to turn to a new demographic: Those who respond, when asked for their ethnic background by the census, as “American.”

This ethnic/ancestral type reflects, presumably, Americans who no longer know, or no longer care, about the various derivations which contribute to their family trees. They’ve become a modern, generic homogenized ethnicity – the American-American.

I suspect I’m close to joining the American-Americans. I’m a little hazy on my family tree, beyond the knowledge that I’ve got some German, some Welsh, some Scottish and English progenitors. With such vague, and diverse, roots, simply calling myself “American” makes more and more sense to me.

Link to the full map & tool: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/AmericanAmericans?:embed=y&:display_count=no

The Foreign-Born in America

Foreign_BornToday I take a brief break from ethnicity to look at the percentage of residents in American zip codes who were born outside of the United States. This isn’t the same as the percentage of non-citizens, mind you, which I looked at separately, and which I’ve turned in to the Reveille. One of the major themes of my series on ethnic/racial heritage is that the United States is an immigrant nation – the primary difference between each immigrant group is order of arrival.

The map of foreign-born residents is the simplest way to see where the newest immigrants have settled – where the newest addition to our mixing bowl can be found. Some may not be citizens, and there is no way at the moment to tell whether they’ll be able to become legal citizens of the United States. That debate is a big part of why I became interested in this data. However, legal or not, they’re here – and now we can see visually *where* they are. Originally, ancestry and ethnic mix seemed like a good, quick way to show that the United States is a hodge-podge of post-Revolution immigrants. Instead, I found the dispersal of different ancestries compelling. Many maps later, here we are.

Share with anyone you know living in the United States, but born outside her borders. They can see how many of their neighbors share their non-native born status.

A link to my Tableau visualization, which allows for more exploration of the data and the map: https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/ForeignBorn

Polish-Americans

PolishPolish-Americans are highly concentrated among the Great Lakes region of the United States, showing much less diffusion than some of the other ancestries I’ve looked at, like the Irish.

Aside from their fairly specific geographic distribution, the Polish-American population doesn’t hold many surprises. I had thought there’d be more Poles, but one problem with preconceptions about ancestry is that there are so many different ancestries which make up the American landscape that it’s difficult to get a handle on all of them at once, as well as their relative prevalence. When I approach the end of this project, I do hope to put together a single map showing multiple ancestral/ethnic groupings at once — but I’m running into technical difficulties, and it remains a challenging work in progress. Cross your fingers for me!

Here’s a link to my Tableau on Polish-Americans, so you can drill down, zoom in, etc:

https://public.tableausoftware.com/profile/jared5561#!/vizhome/supercensus/Polish

 

Native Sons – A map of Americans living in the state where they were born.

Born_In_StateHaving seen an interactive the New York Times did recently looking at migration within the United States, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/16/upshot/mapping-migration-in-the-united-states-since-1900.html?WT.mc_id=AD-D-E-KEYWEE-SOC-FP-NOV-AUD-DEV-ROS-1101-1204&bicmp=AD&bicmlukp=WT.mc_id&bicmst=1414728000&bicmet=1451538000&ad-keywords=KeyweeCampaign&kwp_0=4807&_r=0&abt=0002&abg=1, I decided that maybe I should go ahead and share my own take on it.

I looked at what I called “Native Sons” almost as soon as I started playing with the zipcode-level census data. The clear state borders you can see really stood out to me. Sadly, I didn’t think anyone else would be as interested in that… But from what I’ve seen of responses to the Times interactive, this is not the case. At least for Louisiana – one of the biggest homebodies of all the states. Born here, stay here, die here, apparently. Either the state is awesome, or we’re kind of timid/boring.

Enjoy!

Link to interactive:https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/supercensus/BornInState?:embed=y&:display_count=no